Summary of Editorials from the Hebrew Press


Summary of Editorials from the Hebrew Press

 

The Jerusalem Post writes: “Much of the attrof the Oscar-winning documentary Strangers No More is its unique perspective on Israel as a country that celebrates diversity and tolerance. An embattled Jewish state, observed from afar primarily through the prism of conflict with its neighbors, is shown to have produced Tel Aviv’s remarkable Bialik-Rogozin School, with a compassionate, dedicated staff laboring lovingly to integrate into Israeli society non-Jewish migrant children from 48 different nations. Yet there is an ominous subtext, not explored in the movie. Of the school’s 828 pupils, 120 face deportation with their families because they do not meet government criteria for obtaining legal status. While we do support the adoption in the future of more stringent immigration laws that would make it harder for foreigners to come to Israel and stay here, these 400 children and their families do not present a demographic threat to Israel.”
Yediot Aharonot offers that, “History is repeating itself.” The author professes that “Revolutions, in order to end well, sometimes need outside assistance. Therefore, sitting on the fence does not mean ‘respecting the autonomy’ of the protesters, but rather neglecting them.”
 
Yisrael Hayom maintains that “The Muslim Brotherhood is beginning to settle over the craters of the social and democratic volcanoes that have erupted in Arab countries in order to lead towards renewed Islamic alternatives.”
Haaretz comments on the government’s decision to inform the Supreme Court of its intention to immediately demolish all unauthorized settler outposts on privately-owned Palestinian land: “The right wing has learned that in most cases a combination of violent demonstrations and political pressure is enough to turn such decisions into requests that the Supreme Court instead allow the outposts to remain, and to continue to turn a blind eye to their expansion. The rule of law in a democratic state demands the dismantlement of all the outposts. The preservation of the Jewish character of Israel demands a complete freeze on all the settlements in the territories, until the close of negotiations on their fate.”
Ma’ariv contends that, “instead of supporting Israeli tour guides, the state allows foreign guides, some of whom are Israel-haters, to present the country to tourists. Thus we forfeit our own public diplomacy.”

 

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