Summary of Editorials from the Hebrew Press

Two papers note that “Israel Apartheid Week” is being marked on various college and university campuses around the world:
 


Summary of Editorials from the Hebrew Press
Two papers note that “Israel Apartheid Week” is being marked on various college and university campuses around the world:
 
Ma’ariv regrets that “The facts about the situation of Israeli Arabs or the Palestinians’ responsibility for their own situation will not affect those celebrating ‘Apartheid Week’ against Israel.”  The author asserts that “Apartheid exists in Syria and Turkey against the Kurdish minority, and in Bahrain against the Shi’ite minority,” but adds that “There is no apartheid festival about them.”  The paper asserts that “There is room to criticize Israel,” but avers that, “Those who accuse Israel of apartheid want neither an agreement nor equality.  They want what Ahmadinejad wants: The elimination of the Zionist entity and the denial of the Jews’ right – and only of the Jews, out of all the nations of the world – to self-determination.”
 
Yisrael Hayom accuses the organizers of “Israel Apartheid Week” of ignoring not only genuine apartheid in Iran, Sudan and Syria but the fact that Israel has never adopted laws similar to the 1950’s apartheid legislation in South Africa.  The author notes that he heard the call of the muzzein as he ate last Saturday in Jaffa and says: “In Tunisia, a member of the Arab League, there is a ban on microphones at mosques due to the fear of Islamic extremism.  But Israel, ‘the apartheid state’, rightly allows imams to call the faithful.”
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Yediot Aharonot believes that the content of the Public Diplomacy and Diaspora Affairs Ministry’s informational website is partisan.  The author suggests that “The Prime Minister did not at all intend to teach Israelis what to say to foreigners but what to think about the country,” and accuses him of “using state funds for party purposes.”  The paper concludes that “This campaign should arouse not only debate among information experts but the interest of the State Comptroller as well.”The Jerusalem Post discusses the rabbinical rights of women in light of the animosity which erupted in the U.S. Orthodox community after a woman was ordained as the rabbi of an Orthodox congregation. The editor wonders at the extreme Orthodox reaction, considering the fact that technically, there is no clear halachic prohibition against the ordination of female rabbis, and states that “The male rabbinic establishment should start acting like, well, men – and allow women to prove themselves on an even playing field.”
Haaretz warns that “The quiet on the security front in recent months is illusory and misleading.” The editor claims that “Palestinian terror has ceased almost completely, but the violence of the occupation has not,” and adds: “If nothing is done, we should not be surprised if the flames break out again, not only in the territories but also in complacent, tranquil Israel.

 

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