Summary of Editorials from the Hebrew Press

Yediot Aharonot suggests that the fact that “Nobody in Israel has a reasonable answer to the critical question,” of “How would a war between Israel and Iran end,” may be what is causing the Israeli leadership to consider its options very carefully before launching a strike on Iran’s nuclear facilities.”
 


Summary of Editorials from the Hebrew Press
Yediot Aharonot suggests that the fact that “Nobody in Israel has a reasonable answer to the critical question,” of “How would a war between Israel and Iran end,” may be what is causing the Israeli leadership to consider its options very carefully before launching a strike on Iran’s nuclear facilities.”
 
Ma’ariv supports the idea of a referendum on any peace agreement involving the cession of territory: “A referendum will be unaffected by narrow coalition interests and will properly express the will of the public.  And therefore, it should also apply to territories that we would like to annex.”
 
Yisrael Hayom avers that “Six months after Saad Hariri, the leader of the Sunni community in Lebanon, succeeded in defeating Hezbollah and its supporters, it is becoming clear who really won the elections and who is slowly perfecting his influence over Lebanon,” and adds “Of course, it is [Syrian] President Bashar Al-Assad, whom Hariri visited in his palace yesterday to fawn over and request his forgiveness and patronage.”  The author says that Hariri had no choice but to abandon the anti-Syrian stance that he took five years ago, when he accused Syria of being behind the murder of his father Rafik, after failing to receive anything more than verbal support from the US and Saudi Arabia in the struggle against Hezbollah.  However, the paper wonders if “Hariri and Assad have missed the train and whether they are destined to discover that the landlords in Lebanon are no longer the Syrians but Iran and its ally Hezbollah.”
The Jerusalem Post ponders the low rate of aliya from the United States, which “stubbornly remains numerically insignificant” despite the fact that the US has by far the largest Jewish population after Israel, and declares that “The obstacle to American aliya is not financial. It is cultural.” The editor notes that “To bring American Jews, Israel must become open to American dreams,” and concludes:  “If we want to bring American olim, we, as a nation, have to give them a reason to come.”
Haaretz attacks the amendment to be discussed today by the Ministerial Committee for Legislation, which is designed to enshrine in law the amendment to the Citizenship Law prohibiting Israeli Arabs from living with their chosen partners, and states that “The ministerial committee must not support this bill, which deals a mortal blow to the right to family life and the right to marriage as recognized in civilized countries. Immigration, marriage and family-unity requests should be handled on an individual, not categorical, basis.”

 

 

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