Summary of Editorials from the Hebrew Press

Yediot Aharonot asserts that “We must quickly decide whether or not to hold intense negotiations with the Palestinian Authority, lest it join forces with Hamas and we will then face a united three-pronged front – the Palestinian Authority, Hamas and Israeli Arabs.”
 


Summary of Editorials from the Hebrew Press
Yediot Aharonot asserts that “We must quickly decide whether or not to hold intense negotiations with the Palestinian Authority, lest it join forces with Hamas and we will then face a united three-pronged front – the Palestinian Authority, Hamas and Israeli Arabs.”
 
Ma’ariv suggests that the Nobel committee “wanted one more chance, seemingly the last, to remind those who are interested, just how pleased it is to see that President [George W. Bush] go.  That is not a reason to condemn Obama; the committee’s decision is not his fault.”
 
Yisrael Hayom notes that “Israel’s enemies are already utilizing Judge Goldstone’s Judaism to strengthen their claims, the Swedish government is also using it to attack Israel,” and suggests that “This necessitates raising for debate the negative consequences of Jews and Israelis who try to delegitimize the actions of the Jewish state.”
 
Walla opines that “The Arab public in Israel is not interested in violence in the holy places,” but instead argues that “The Netanyahu Government’s diplomatic rejectionism is liable to lead to a popular uprising.”
 
Nana10! professes that “Past events have taught that Friday’s [Muslim] prayers represent an extensive pasture for the recruiting of activists for the day of action,” and recalls that “The imam of Furedis succeeded in recruiting thousands of rioters to the streets during the first days of the al-Aqsa intifada.”
 
The Jerusalem Post comments on charges for trafficking cocaine from Panama against two leading mobsters which have had to be dropped humiliatingly, with the police forced to admit that they had nothing that could stand up in court.  The editor finds fault with the unjustified hubris and self-congratulation of the Israel police after the bust, and declares: “That top officers felt the need to blow their own horns, exulting in victories that were not yet won, signaled their desperation for a PR coup. The embarrassing result has also underlined that the police have yet to make the conceptual transition required in their fundamental approach to crime-busting if they are to prevail against sophisticated offenders and make us all safer.”
Haaretz declares that “Obama’s Nobel Prize is more an award for the hope of peace than a sign of recognition for making peace.” Quoting Abdullah II of Jordan, the editor adds that “The king said that Obama’s commitment to advancing regional peace has created a rare opportunity to end this volatile conflict. The Nobel Prize was given to the president as an incentive to realize that commitment.”